Abstract Drawing of a Bee | Video

This is a 9″x12″ abstract drawing of a bee, created with markers, paint pens, colored pencils, pens, and watercolor mediums. The vibrant, warm color palette and loose style adds a frantic feeling to the artwork. Quick strokes of color and medium are blurred around the paper with spatters of watercolor to create a sense of movement and buzzing. Silver and gold paint is also used to add a shimmering effect to the bee.

The accompanying video shows how I draw and paint the abstract bee in a time lapse format. The composition was initially sketched with light yellow, followed by rich oranges, reds, and silver and gold paint pens. Lush mixes of watercolors and white highlights were also applied to the entire artwork.

Abstract Drawing of a Bee

14 Replies to “Abstract Drawing of a Bee | Video”

  1. it’s amazing on how you can mix variety of media on the painting. though it looks ‘sketchy’ but the overall presentation was visible & can be understood.
    Would like to invite you to my newly built blog..showcasing my black&white potrait drawing using only pencils. Thank you.

  2. heyy this is amazing i rele love this bee!
    i am attempting to make my ow abstract art right now and i was woundering how,when you did this bee, how did u pick your colours and im confused on how to lay the colours would you go in a pattern of light to dark dark to light, or does it somehow go from the colour wheel pattern??

    a reply wuld be much appreciated
    thankyou
    and this is amzing art!!you did fantastic!!

  3. Michael-
    This one is just absolutely gorgeous!!! You can feel the little bee and all his energy. You’ve really created a sense of motion.

    There’s an old saying- that’s applicable: ‘Moving while standing perfectly still.’

    It’s wonderful.
    Vikki

  4. It’s probably not surprising, but it appears to me that you have incorporated some of the colors and style from your December 27th, 2008 “Abstract Painting” into the legs of this bee painting. It’s fun to watch your progress.

  5. Thank you ainzz!
    You have good questions! However, I picked my colors in a very intuitive way. I do not have plans or color wheels, I just make it up as I go along, trying to put as little thought as possible between intention and action. In hindsight, I think of bees as yellow and black, and the white helps to add depth, like highlights over dark shadows. The blue/purple flower also helps to pop out the yellow bee, because they are complimentary colors. The gradient yellow/red/green background is compositional, works to balance or unbalance the image, and is suggestive of out-of-focus natural background.

    This is not to say I haven’t learned about color, or used color wheels before. I do think it is very important to learn. But I just am not as conscious of all the information I have learned over the years as I draw or paint.

    Good luck with your artistic pursuits! 🙂

    ~Michael

  6. Thanks Vikki! That’s a HUGE compliment! 🙂

    I was watching these little bees fly around my sunflowers this past summer, and they rarely stop for a break. I suppose that is where another old saying comes from: “Busy as a bee!” 😉

    ~Michael

  7. Thanks Daddy-o!
    I wasn’t aware of that progression and incorporation of old style in this new painting, but now I see it! Thanks for pointing that out! 🙂
    ~Michael

  8. You are absolutely amazing! I love the bee. Of course I am a real novice about art, but I like what I see and watching you draw it is just unbelievable.

  9. you are soo i talented, i am only 15 and i have an art exam soon and i need some tips on drawing hands is there any way u can help me plsss! i had a small argument with my art teacher about the subject on drawing hands cause she didnt want me to do it, so if u help me i could prove that my idea is suitable. if u dig me! frm bukki frm london

  10. Hi Bukki,
    Thanks for your interest in my artwork!

    I think hand studies are great way to improve your life drawing skills. One of my favorite drawings is called “Study of Female Hands” by Leonardo Da Vinci.

    You can even draw your own hand, by placing your non-drawing hand on the table, and sketching with the other. I have a few examples of colorful hand studies, but I recommend starting with a pencil or charcoal to understand the structure of the hand first. Sometimes drawing the hand of a skeleton is helpful for understanding the bone structure as well. Ultimately there is no “right” or “wrong” way, unless your teacher has set guidelines, art is an expression of yourself.

    Good luck with your artistic pursuits! 🙂

    ~Michael

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